In this week’s interview we have spoken to Michael R. Blumberg, independent consultant and President of Blumberg Advisory Group, about the latest technologies field service businesses need to implement and what managers can do to create a culture of innovation.

You are consulting a lot of companies on strategic planning and efficiency improvement. What are your customers’ pain points?

I help my customers unlock value within their service supply chain like for example technical support, field services, services parts logistics or depot repair. For example, they may face challenges growing top line revenue or boosting profits. They may be trying to improve various KPIs associated with service quality and productivity. Others are focused on reducing costs, improving operating efficiency, or enhancing customer experience. One specific set of challenges I help clients deal with is validating their need to implement new technology to automated key business processes and functions.

What do you advise those companies to meet those challenges? 

I help them compare their current business processes and performance to best practices and industry standards. As part of this evaluation, I help them understand where there are gaps and how they can close them through process and systems improvements. I then make specific recommendations on what the new processes and systems should look like.

According to you, what are the top technologies that will change how businesses deliver service in the future? 

Every management guru and industry analyst wants to point to disruptive technologies like IoT, wearables, drones, and 3D printing as the top technologies that will change how service will be delivered in the future. No doubt these technologies will have a dramatic impact on the future of service. However, in order for these technologies to have any real and measurable benefit, they need to be incorporated into a company’s overall service business strategy, service delivery processes, and systems infrastructure.

More importantly, it may be a long time in the future until a company is ready and able to make these investments. In the meantime, there is lower hanging fruit they can pick off the trees that will help them achieve measurable gains in service performance, in a shorter period of time. For example, technologies like social collaboration, mobility, cloud computing, crowdsourcing platforms, or knowledge management. Businesses should consider implementing these technologies, if they haven’t done so already.

Do you have particular examples of companies that have innovated their field service? What results do they see? 

Most examples usually center on implementing some form of field service software. Either a basic system with dispatch, depot repair, and inventory management functionality or more advanced systems with capabilities for dynamic scheduling, spare parts optimization, field service mobility, and knowledge management. The results include greater control over people and parts, improved access to real-time business intelligence, better decision making, lower operating costs, improved utilization of parts and labor, and increased productivity of field resources.

Which features should a field service software ideally have? 

Businesses seeking to implement a field service software solution should consider features which automate critical service delivery processes and capture key data related to service transactions. In addition, the software should have the capability to produce performance reports in order to evaluate how well the processes are working. At a minimum, field service software should include feature functionality for work order management, parts usage, customer history, equipment history, time and cost tracking, and reporting & metrics. More advanced features might include mobility, contract management, and dynamic scheduling, routing, and knowledge management.

Do you feel there is a fear on the side of businesses to implement new technologies? Or are they open to innovation? 

I think most field service leaders today recognize that their businesses need to innovate in order to survive and thrive. Without innovation, they risk going out of business. This was not always the perspective of service businesses. Looking back, 15 or 20 years ago, there were more field service leaders who resisted innovation than embraced it. Technology was often perceived to be a threat to their existence. Now most field service leaders see innovation as a given. Sure business executives still have fears about innovation, its human nature. However, the fears are more realistic then in the past. Rather than an irrational fear about being replaced by a machine, the fear is centered around whether or not their companies are ready for innovation, whether the implementation will go smoothly, and whether the results will live up to the promise.

What would you advise managers to do in terms of getting everyone on board with innovating service processes? 

Managers really need to make sure that everyone understands and appreciates where the business is in terms of current levels of productivity and efficiency. They need to communicate this with all stakeholders and help them understand the risks associated with maintaining the status quo versus the rewards associated with pursing innovation. In addition, managers must create a well-defined plan for innovation and communicate the plan with key stakeholders. Most importantly, managers must create an environment which motivates and rewards people for embracing innovation.

 

Topics: Field Service

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